The Trauma of Our Time

This is a difficult time, the kind that can cause us to store trauma in our bodies as we try to cope—with new demands, with the loss of our sense of autonomy, with the anxiety of not knowing what’s coming next…

Trauma is the response of our nervous system to an overwhelming situation. It is not the event, it’s how we deal with it.

Trauma lives on…if we let it.

What we don’t process at the time it occurs will live with us in our energy field, where it interferes with our ability to function well as life goes on.

The problem is, we aren’t given the tools.

What we need is on-the-spot, do-it-yourself ways of dispersing the energy of trauma before it becomes solidified in our energy field. There are several methods of energy work. I’ve used a number of them to good effect in recent years.

There are some simple things you can do on your own—an important factor in these days of physical distancing. The short video below demonstrates one of these methods. You might think it looks too simple. But try it. I was surprised at the amount of tension it melted away in me—tension I didn’t know I was holding. And I’m glad it’s gone so it can’t solidify somewhere and come back to haunt me later!

You’ll notice it is kids who are demonstrating. This video appeared in a recent blogpost by ACEP, the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology. The subject was Help Your Kids Calm Down Faster. If you are responsible for children during this time, I think you’ll find it worthwhile. Especially noteworthy is the preventive tip I have quoted here. It applies to all of us.

Pro Tip: Instead of waiting until your child is totally overwhelmed, integrate this technique with your kids throughout the day. This will help them stay calmer all day long and hopefully avoid some major blow-ups.

ACRP has a page with videos of three additional calming techniques, accompanied  instruction sheets. They suggest these activities for times when you are feeling

  • anxious, agitated, or upset
  • tense or keyed up
  • attacked or traumatized
  • disconnected
  • unable to focus and br present

After doing these simple activities, people typically feel more calm, centred, balanced, grounded, relaxed, and better able to focus. Simple energy techniques are a good way to keep ourselves on an even keel in stressful times. Give it a try and see what you think.

What if…childhood trauma and adult health issues are connected?

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACE Study) is a research study of over 17,000 people conducted in the US by Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants were recruited between 1995 and 1997 and have been followed to see what happened to their health over the years since then.

This study has come up frequently in recent health seminars because it demonstrates an association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) with health and social problems in adulthood.

Here is Dr. Vincent Felitti, one of the principal investigators on this study, to tell you more about how childhood trauma can lead to serious illness later in life. Continue reading

Responsible…but not to blame

coping quote

Image via Daisy on Sizzle

I burst out laughing when this graphic appeared on my Facebook feed. Judging from the number of likes, I wasn’t the only one. I think it’s one of those things that makes us laugh because we recognize the truth of it in ourselves. Since I was working on this blogpost that day, it packed an extra punch for me.

The ending of the original quote, attributed to German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, is that it makes us stronger. While that can be true, it doesn’t magically happen. Using our difficulties to grow and become more resilient requires attention. It gives us the chance to release the energetic effects of trauma, so we can reconnect with ourselves to become ever-more whole. Continue reading